Describe different types of database relationship

describe different types of database relationship

In an entity relationship diagram (ERD), an entity type is represented by a name in a box You should also be familiar with different kinds of entities including Later on we will discuss fixing the attributes to fit correctly into the relational model. A typical example is the entity relationship model, which uses main concepts like List and briefly describe the common record-based logical data models. Types of database models; Relational model; Hierarchical model; Network model to describe a database with any one of these depending on several factors.

However, hourly rate could be sensitive data that only certain database users should see. So, by putting the hourly rate into a separate table, we can provide extra security around the Pay table so that only certain users can access the data in that table. One-to-Many or Many-to-One This is the most common relationship type.

In this type of relationship, a row in table A can have many matching rows in table B, but a row in table B can have only one matching row in table A.

  • Types of Relationships
  • Relational databases: Defining relationships between database tables

Example of one-to-many relationship. One-to-Many relationships can also be viewed as Many-to-One relationships, depending on which way you look at it.

Each customer can only be assigned one city.

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One city can be assigned to many customers. Many-to-Many In a many-to-many relationship, a row in table A can have many matching rows in table B, and vice versa. A many-to-many relationship could be thought of as two one-to-many relationships, linked by an intermediary table. This table is used to link the other two tables together. It does this by having two fields that reference the primary key of each of the other two tables.

Relationship types in DBMS

The following is an example of a many-to-many relationship: This is the Relationships tab that is displayed when you create a relationship Microsoft Access. In this case, a many-to-many relationship has just been created. The Orders table is a junction table that cross-references the Customers table with the Products table.

Before you begin to establish relationships between tables in the database, you must know what types of relationships can exist between a given pair of tables.

Database - Explain the types of relationships in database

Knowing how to identify them properly is an invaluable skill for designing a database successfully. There are three specific types of relationships that can exist between a pair of tables: The tables participate in only one type of relationship at any given time. You'll rarely need to change the type of relationship between a pair of tables.

describe different types of database relationship

Only major changes in either of the table's structures could cause you to change the relationship. Note The discussion for each type of relationship begins with a generic example of the relationship.

Learning how to visualize a relationship generically enables you to understand the principle behind the relationship itself.

describe different types of database relationship

Once you understand how and why the relationship works, you'll be able to determine whether it exists between a given pair of tables quite easily. Each discussion also includes an example of how to diagram the relationship.

Database - Explain the types of relationships in database

I provide special instructions pertaining to the diagramming process where appropriate and explain the symbols incorporated within the diagram as necessary. This allows you to learn the diagramming method at a reasonable pace and keeps you from having to memorize the entire set of diagram symbols all at once.

Diagramming symbols for a data table and a subset table. One-to-One Relationships A pair of tables bears a one-to-one relationship when a single record in the first table is related to only one record in the second table, and a single record in the second table is related to only one record in the first table. A generic example of a one-to-one relationship. A one-to-one relationship usually but not always involves a subset table.

This example also illustrates a situation where neither of the tables is a subset table.

Database Management Systems

A typical example of a one-to-one relationship. Indeed, neither of the tables in Figure Diagramming a one-to-one relationship. The line that appears between the tables in the diagram indicates the type of relationship, and there is a particular line that you use for each type. Later in this chapter, you'll learn how to modify the line to show the characteristics of the relationship as well. Note that a Data Table symbol represents each table.

One-to-Many Relationships A one-to-many relationship exists between a pair of tables when a single record in the first table can be related to one or more records in the second table, but a single record in the second table can be related to only one record in the first table. Let's look at a generic example of this type of relationship. This is by far the most common relationship that exists between a pair of tables in a database, and it is the easiest to identify. It is crucial from a data-integrity standpoint because it helps to eliminate duplicate data and to keep redundant data to an absolute minimum.

A typical example of a one-to-many relationship. Diagramming a one-to-many relationship. Note that the crow's foot symbol is always located next to the table on the "many" side of the relationship. Many-to-Many Relationships A pair of tables bears a many-to-many relationship when a single record in the first table can be related to one or more records in the second table and a single record in the second table can be related to one or more records in the first table.

This is the second most common relationship that exists between a pair of tables in a database. It can be a little more difficult to identify than a one-to-many relationship, so you must be sure to examine the tables carefully.

A typical example of a many-to-many relationship. Diagramming a many-to-many relationship. In this case, there is a crow's foot symbol located next to each table. Problems with Many-to-Many Relationships A many-to-many relationship has an inherent peculiarity that you must address before you can effectively use the data from the tables involved in the relationship.

The issue is this: How do you easily associate records from the first table with records in the second table in order to establish the relationship? This is an important question because you'll encounter problems such as these if you do not establish the relationship properly: It will be tedious and somewhat difficult to retrieve information from one of the tables. One of the tables will contain a large amount of redundant data. Duplicate data will exist within both tables.

It will be difficult for you to insert, update, and delete data. There are two common methods that novice and inexperienced developers use in a futile attempt to address this situation.